FEDERALALLIES.ORG Press Release

February 27, 2017

President Donald J. Trump Delivers on Campaign Promises at First Joint Session of Congress

Washington, D.C. (February 27, 2017) On Tuesday, February 28, 2017 President Trump is to deliver his first address to a joint session of Congress to outline his budgetary and economic priorities.

Released today, the skinny budget, and not yet the full-blown budget, are the President’s policies, as reflected in topline discretionary spending.  “To that end, it is a true America-first budget.  It will show the President is keeping his promises and doing exactly what he said he was going to do when he ran for office.  It prioritizes rebuilding the military, including restoring our nuclear capabilities; protecting the nation and securing the border; enforcing the laws currently on the books; taking care of Vets; and increasing school choice.  And it does all of that without adding to the currently projected FY 2018 deficit,” said Director of the Office of Management and Budget, Mick Mulvaney at The White House Press Briefing.

“The top line defense discretionary number is $603 billion.  That’s a $54-billion increase — it’s one of the largest increases in history.  It’s also the number that allows the President to keep his promise to undo the military sequester.  The topline nondefense number will be $462 billion.  That’s a $54-billion savings.  It’s the largest-proposed reduction since the early years of the Reagan administration.

“The reductions in nondefense spending follow the same model — it’s the President keeping his promises and doing exactly what he said he was going to do.  It reduces money that we give to other nations, it reduces duplicative programs, and it eliminates programs that simply don’t work.

“The bottom line is this:  The President is going to protect the country and do so in exactly the same way that every American family has had to do over the last couple years, and that’s prioritize spending,” said Mulvaney.

A skinny budget makes no reference to mandatory spending, entitlement reforms, tax policies, revenue projections, or the infrastructure plan.  The full-blown budget is due in May.

“We anticipate the full-blown budget to follow most recommendations of The Heritage Foundation Blue Print for Reform: A Comprehensive Policy Agenda for a New Administration in 2017 to reduce and streamline the federal government by 20%, said David T. Boddie, Executive Director, Federal Allies Institute.

“We are pleased with these goals because Federal Allies Institute’s first policy decision was to advocate the association’s full-support behind Simpson Bowles and I believe we have been the sole federal contractor-comprised association in full-support of not selling to the federal government what it does not need and cannot afford,” said Boddie.

“We have always been America First and we look forward to hearing the President’s remarks and working with the administration for a streamlined federal government,” said Boddie.

 

About Federal Allies Institute

Federal Allies Institute is a national nonpartisan trade association dedicated to federal acquisition best practices. Federal Allies Institute is an IRC 501(c) (6) tax-exempt association and organized as a non-stock corporation (non-profit) in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

CONTACT:

Communications@FederalAllies.org

 


Eversheds merges with Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP to form Eversheds Sutherland

February 3, 2017

Federal Allies Institute is pleased to inform its small business members London-headquartered Eversheds and U.S.-based Sutherland Asbill & Brennan have merged, creating a new global law firm known as Eversheds Sutherland.

The combined entity, which now boasts of more than 2,300 lawyers in 61 offices across 29 countries, will be led by joint CEOs as part of a six-strong global management team.

Eversheds Sutherland (International) managing partner and CEO-elect Lee Ranson and Eversheds Sutherland (US) managing partner Mark Wasserman have been appointed as joint CEOs.

According to a media statement, no significant internal structural changes are expected within either firm, and respective practice group heads will work together to co-lead client initiatives.

The move comes months after merger plans were announced in December 2016.  “During the past two years under its new name Eversheds Sutherland has become a top supporter of Federal Allies Institute providing great assistance to our national Federal Allies Summits and Washington Days Conference and we very much look forward to continuing this alliance, said David T. Boddie, Founder & Executive Director, Federal Allies Institute.


200th Anniversary U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee

December 6, 2016

December 10, 1816
Senate Creates Permanent Committees

Photo of Foreign Relations Committee in Session

For its first quarter-century, the Senate tried to operate without permanent legislative committees.  From 1789 until December 1816, the Senate relied on three-to-five-member temporary—or “select”—committees to sift and refine legislative proposals.  A late eighteenth-century guidebook to “how a bill becomes a law” would have explained the process in three steps.  First, the full Senate met to discuss the broad objectives of a proposed bill.  Next, members elected a temporary committee to convert the general ideas expressed during that floor discussion into specific bill text.  The senator who received the most votes automatically became chairman.  This system ensured that committees would consist only of those who basically supported the proposed legislation and that activist members would have more committee assignments than those who were less engaged in the legislative process.  In the third step, after the committee sent its recommendations to the full Senate, it went out of existence.

In 1806, concerned over the increasing amounts of time consumed in electing dozens of temporary committees each session, the Senate began to send new legislation to previously appointed select committees that had dealt with similar topics.  Soon, the Senate also began dividing the president’s annual State of the Union message into sections by subject matter and referring each section to a different select committee.

The emergency conditions of the War of 1812 accelerated the transition from temporary to permanent committees by highlighting the importance of legislative continuity and expertise.  In December 1815, at the start of a new Congress and with the war ended, the Senate appointed the usual select committees to consider the president’s annual message, but, when those panels completed that task, the presiding officer assigned them bills on related subjects, thereby keeping them in operation.  During that session, however, the Senate also appointed nearly 100 additional temporary committees.  Once again the upper house was spending excessive amounts of time voting on committee members.

On December 10, 1816, the Senate took the final step and formally converted 11 major select panels into permanent “standing” committees.  This action ensured that those committees, each with five members, would be available not only to handle immediate legislative proposals, but also to deal with ongoing problems and to provide oversight of executive branch operations.

(Photo:  Members of the Foreign Relations Committee meet, ca. 1970. Senate Historical Office)

Reference Items:

U.S. Congress. Senate. The Senate, 1789-1989, Vol. 2, by Robert C. Byrd. 100th Cong., 1st sess., 1991. S. Doc.100-20.


Transforming DoD’s Core Business Processes for Revolutionary Change

January 23, 2015

defense-business-board-report-012215